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Posts Tagged ‘wild boar chops’

Antica Macelleria Falorni is the oldest butcher shop in Italy. In 1729 Gio Batta founded the Macelleria Falorni Butchers in Greve Italy. In 1840 the word Antica which means ancient was added and still hangs today. It’s in the Chianti region of Tuscany. Through the generations the techniques, recipes and “secrets” to the incredibly high quality products that they produce which have been passed down from father to son. Today it is being run by the 8th generation grandsons Lorenzo and Stefano Falorni. Their attention to quality begins with using the highest quality local certified meats, Chianina for Beef and Cinta Senese for Pork and wild boars that come from the woods of the Chianti region. Spices such as fennel, laurel, juniper, garlic, parsley, sage, rosemary and more are used and all come from the local region. With this plethora of local ingredients it couldn’t be helped to create the Salumi – Salted meats, ham, salami prosciutto and more that are are characterized by the unique smell known only to fine Italian products. Even the Chianti Classico is added to some of the preparations of sausage and salame that are typical to the region of Greve also contributing to the nature of the product.

Bistec Fiorentina

Mark Schatzker said in his book “Steak, One Man’s Search for the world’s Tastiest Piece of Beef”,  the Falorni is as much a busy butcher shop as a living ode to its butchering past. Out front, facing the town square stands a butcher block that was the primary meat hacking surface from 1820 to 1956. The interior is filled with tools of the butchering trade, a stuffed wild boar, old copper scales, black & white photos of Chianinas, a bright red meat grinder and a sausage stuffing machine from 1930.

The attention to detail even goes as far as to what kind of wood is best for grilling the beef. The recommend oak and Stefano will go as far as cutting his own wood and bringing it to friends homes to make sure that the meats get their due respect.

This is one of the wonders found in the Chianti Region of Tuscany Italy. A wonderful place that we will be visiting on our Photo/Culinary experiences. Come join us in 2011 and explore the culinary wonders of this rich part of the world. Early discounts available here’s the link – Experience Italy

* Photos courtesy of Vivandare.it, Informacibo.it and Antica Macelleria Falorni

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The third course of this sumptuous tasting was a Duo of wild boar, chops with morel mushroom fava bean fricassee,crispy belly with tomato and pepper confiture. Chef Adam Horton, like me and many other chefs loves pork and all things pig. Whether it’s domestic, wild or heritage, pig is in my mind the finest meat out there.

Rick & "Goose" on the line ready to plate the pork duo

Rick & "Goose" on the line ready to plate the pork duo

Earlier in the evening I was helping Ramon and Chris the Sous Chef, prep the wild boar racks for service. Each rack needed to be trimmed of all fat and sinew to leave only the tender meat on the bone. Each bone needed to be “frenched” a process that removes all meat and cartilage from the rib bone above the tenderloin leaving only a clean exposed rib. The pork belly was braised the previous day to a melt in your mouth tenderness, and chilled in the walk-in. The day of the event the pork bellies were removed and cut into 3/4″ thick slices and then deep fried for service to give them a crispy outside with a soft center. The boar racks were all grilled on a mesquite grill, by Ramon, grill master extraordinaire, to add some of that smokey flavor. Nothing beats cooking meats over a wood fire whether it be steaks, pork and even seafood.  It was time to get all the components together on the line for plating. We assembled on the hot line, Rick working sauté, Ramon working the grill, Heather heating the morel fava bean fricassee and Manny, Goose & myself there to plate.

Marco and Juan Garcia ready to go.
Marco and Juan Garcia ready to go

Time for service, the hot plates go down on the line and in assembly line fashion we each grab an element of the dish and start to go down the line. We traded off one had the tomato confiture and the other the fricasse those went down first, followed by the greens on the tomato confiture and next the meat.  Ramon was getting the chops up to temp and slicing them while Rick was heating the pork belly up to temp for us to plate.  Once the meat was down the sauce was applied and it went up on the pass for the Garcia Brothers to take out to the dining room.

Ramon, sous Chef Chris Kufek and Goose after thrid course goes out

Ramon, sous Chef Chris Kufek and Goose after thrid course goes out

Boar Chops foreground - Duo of wild boar, chops with morel mushroom fava bean fricassee, crispy belly with tomato and pepper confiture

Boar Chops foreground - Duo of wild boar, chops with morel mushroom fava bean fricassee, crispy belly with tomato and pepper confiture

Pork Belly foreground - Duo of wild boar, chops with morel mushroom fava bean fricassee, crispy belly with tomato and pepper confiture

Pork Belly foreground - Duo of wild boar, chops with morel mushroom fava bean fricassee, crispy belly with tomato and pepper confiture

This dish had a flavor profile unto it’s own.  The medium rare boar was tender and very flavorful with a smokey and mildly sweet flavor.  Combining that taste along with the earthy flavor of morels, the freshness of the fava beans and silkiness of cream made for an irresistable tirumverant of decadence that could soothe the most savage of beasts.

The pork belly had a pleasant crunch followed by the sweet moist flavor of bacon without the smokyness melteing in my mouth. The tomato & pepper confiture complimented the pork belly to round out the experience and cut through some of the richness of the meat. Once I tasted the heavenly duo I couldn’t resist doing some flavor combining of my own, so I took a spoonful of the morels and placed a slice of the pork belly on top and endulged myself for the ultimate gastronomic experience.  This course was served with the 2006 Mountain Cuvee.

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