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Archive for the ‘Cooking’ Category

Lobster B&W

It all starts with Lobster

Don’t be fooled by imitations, there is only one Chef Jack Lee. Call him what you want, he answers to Captain Jack or even Kangaroo Jack. His name aside, one thing remains the same; Taste, consistency and innovation in the kitchen. We spent the day with Chef Jack where we experienced a taste of the finer things in life; traditional dishes with an Escoffier twist as interpreted thru the eyes of Mad Jack.

Chef Jack – steady as she goes.

We entered the inner sanctum of a beautiful Beverly Hills estate that is also the private art gallery called the DeVorzon Gallery. The walls were filled with beautiful works of art. As we went through the art filled rooms and corridors we finally set foot into the center of this home of creativity. There it was the hub, the hearth known as the kitchen. It was fitting that the Culinary artist Chef Jack Lee was in his art studio creating excerpts from some of his different culinary portfolios. Unlike many chefs, Jack Lee creates food as an artist creates a portfolio or body of work. He gets his inspiration from the world around him and then begins the process of creating a body of work around a specific theme much like many well known artists before him. The inspiration that created Monet’s Garden series or Picasso’s portraits of women. Weegee’s Naked City and Warhol’s Series of Marilyn Monroe and then there’s Jack Lee’s Portfolio of food inspired by life events. He calls his portfolios “Tasting Collections”.

Chef Jack Lee used food to tell a story, to represent how his clients feel and to personify who they are through his experience of

$100 egg roll in all it’s glory

them. He takes these experiences and translates them onto the plate. A few years ago he went through jaw surgery where he lost his sense of taste. It took him a year and a half to recover his sense of taste and retrain his palate. During his recovery he came up with the idea of his 6th tasting collection called “My True Colors” where he used food and colors to describe his thoughts and feelings through his toughest period after his surgery and his journey back to the culinary world.

A plate full of $100 eggrolls now that’s eating.

It was just such an inspiration that let him to create the $100 eggroll.  He was inspired by the opulence and abundance that surrounded him. It was an homage to the relaunch of his new concept after his jaw surgery. He debuted it at a celebrity fundraiser in Brentwood.

He wanted to add some “bling bling to this modern delicacy that is a staple at Chinese restaurants throughout America.” By using the most expensive seasonal ingredients available to he successfully made the ultimate eggroll. He sourced Maine lobster, seasonal French truffles, the best caviar and gold leaf. He uses taro root instead of napa cabbage to keep the roll fresh and crisp. He makes a raspberry sauce using lobster stock and then pairs it with a glass of Dom Perignon.

We were also lucky to have the opportunity to sample some of the creations from other Taste Collections such as –
Lobster martini that Jack calls it “happy juice”
Lobster broth, lemongrass, vodka with a  salmon scallop lollipop

Lobster Martini

Prime Rib Bahn Mi
Not your average Bahn Mi – prime rib, Huson Valley Foie Gras instead of aoli and a soy foie gras dipping sauce.

Prime Rib Bánh mì

Escargot
with a garlic pesto

Escargot with Pesto

and a Special surprise

Chilean Sea bass (signature dish)
-infused w sake, scallions and ginger – served w green tea soba noodles, scallions soy sauce and garnished with salmon roe.

Chilean Sea Bass with Soba Noodles

So it was a feast for the eyes, palate and all the other senses combined. Chef Jack Lee is a true artist who is among the ranks of the finest chefs around. He is one to watch in the coming years as he will certainly climb to ultimate notoriety.

Cheers, Amelia, Chef Jack and Adam

Chef Jack

We are looking forward to his upcoming Taste Collections inspired by Sake, Tequilla and his travels around the world. Cheers to Chef Jack Lee for taking the time out of his busy Chinoise Catering schedule to show us all a “Taste of the Good-Life.”

Article co-written by Adam Rubenstein & Rico Mandel for The Culinary Image and  VivaLAfoodies.com
Photography provided by Rico Mandel for Mizenplace & The Culinary Image
Video produced, edited and provided by Amelia Yokel

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Balsons Bacon

RJ Balson & Sons bacon Since 1535

It was Thanksgiving morning when I decided to open my first package of RJ Balsons bacon. This is not merely any British Bacon, it is a piece of history, dating back to the time of King Henry the VIII. I can just imagine what it must have been like back in the time when RJ Balson and sons opened their doors in 1535. A family of butchers passing down their skill, recipes and techniques from one generation to the next and now I hold in my hand the culmination of all the previous generations. The oldest butcher shop in the world. Fantastic!

Balson Bacon 3

The Flavor and the Sizzle if you could only smell it.

I could digress and go into a complete history of RJ Balson and Sons and how they opened up a second shop here in the states so we yanks could have the opportunity to indulge ourselves in the authenticity that is British Bacon. I will say this, after coming to America to play professional soccer in Atlanta, Mike Balson, son of Donald Balson,  realized that he couldn’t find any British bacon that had the same flavor or quality that he was used to. So he along with his son Oliver decided to solve that problem. They opened a branch of the family business here in the states. The process began with the sourcing the proper hogs with the right feed combination. The next was to source the same quality of spices and curing ingredients they use back at their home shop in Birdport, Dorset, England. Through this process they successfully created their beloved bacon and other products that were, until 2007, only found in the original Birdport shop.

Unlike American bacon the British version is mostly meat with little fat. The bacon is made from the loins of the hogs rather than the belly, which is traditional for American bacon. Cured and smoked to perfection through centuries old methods RJ Balson and Sons has created the perfect recipe that brings out the sweetness of the meat with a hint of smokieness that lingers on the palate.

The bacon is cured using the same methods that have been passed down for generations and then subtly applewood smoked to create the delicate and sweet flavor of their bacon.

Bacon & Eggs

Finished ready to eat Balson Bacon & eggs & leeks

I ended up serving it with scrambled eggs and leeks to compliment the bacon and yet keep it rather simple. The final result was a breakfast that was so full of amazing subtle flavors and could satiate any palate.

RJ Balson & Sons products are available online at http://www.balsonbutchers.com

In the weeks to come I’ll be sharing more about their bangers and a lot more about their history.

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Braised Spare Ribs

Beer Braised Spare Ribs

I heard about the opportunity to create a recipe for New Belgium Brewing through FoodBuzz.So I figured I’d sign up and see if I was one of the lucky ones that would be chosen. I got the email and then it was time to think what I would make. First check out their website. The only beer they make that I was familiar with was Fat Tire. I check out their site and was blown away with the variety of beers they have to offer. So many styles of beer I just wanted to do a marathon tasting of all of them, but, alas that was not possible. The next best thing was to see if I’d be able to find a location that carried all their beers, well no such luck. At least not around me. So I went to the local BevMo and worked with their selection. I picked out 3 for my recipe.

New Belgium Beers

New Belgian Brewing Beers used in recipe and for pairing

Their Enlightened Black Ale 1554, the Ranger IPA and their Organic wheat beer Mothership Wit. I knew the IPA would have a bit of a bitter flavor and that the 1554 would be more coffee/chocolate like. After reading the description on the bottle I knew it would work well for the flavors that I was thinking of, since it was a bit on the sweet side and not too bitter. The Wheat beer I thought would be a good pairing for my recipe because of it’s citrus and sour flavors  that would balance with the deep rich spice, cocoa and sweet flavor of the ribs.  I decided on beer braised spare ribs and with a beer reduction sauce. I got some wonderful meaty spare ribs and then began my process.

Ingredients:

1 Rack of Spare ribs about 3 pounds

24 oz Ranger IPA

24 oz 1554

2 generous Tblsp Cocoa Powder

1 Tblsp ground Cinnamon

1 C brown Sugar – 3/4 for liquid and 1/4 to adjust sauce if needed

1 tsp ground Cumin

1tsp chili flakes or 1/2 tsp for less spice

Salt & Pepper to taste

1 medium onion diced

8 large cloves of garlic roughly chopped

1 6oz can of tomato paste

Begin by combining all the dry ingredients in a

Ingredients for marinade in Bowl

Ingredients for marinade in Bowl

large bowl and mix well so there are no large chunks of brown sugar, then add chopped onion and garlic salt & pepper at least 1 Tblsp each. Add in beer and mix ingredients well. Lightly trim some fat from the ribs and place in large baking pan bone side up. You may need to cut the rack into 2 or 3 sections to fit in your baking pan. Pour in marinade and make sure the ribs are mostly covered. Cover pan with aluminum foil or plastic wrap and place in refrigerator for at least 4 hours overnight would be better.

After marinating is finished remove from refrigerator

Ribs cut in sections placed meat side down in roasting pan

Ribs cut in sections placed meat side down in roasting pan

and remove cover. Turn ribs meat side up and season with salt & pepper then cover with aluminum foil and put on middle rack in 275º oven for about 4 hours. Check the ribs after 3.5 hrs to see how they are cooking. The meat should be tender when they are done. Times may vary depending on your oven.

Once they are finished remove racks and let stand. If you will be serving them immediately then cover with aluminum foil till you are ready. Pour the braising liquid from the baking pan into a sauce pan through a sieve. If you want to use

Ribs with marinade in the pan before and after braising

Ribs with marinade in the pan before and after braising

cheesecloth in the sieve or strainer that would be even better. The finer the stainer the better.  Add the can of tomato paste and whisk it into the braising liquid. Put burner on high and bring to a boil let the sauce boil till it is reduced by half to 2/3. When it gets close to half reduction taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste and if needed some more brown sugar.

Stages of reducing Braising liquid into sauce

Stages of reducing Braising liquid into sauce from left to right strained braising liquid, boiling to reduce by half to 1/3, finished sauce

Finished ribs before cutting

Finished ribs before cutting - Brushed with sauce and Broiled for final caramelization

When the sauce is finished place ribs under the broiler or on a hot grill to warm and add color to the meat. Then brush with sauce and place back under the broiler or on the grill till carmelized. It’s all about personal preference at that point.

When done slice ribs along the bone to separate into individual ribs and serve with sauce.

I paired the ribs with the Mothership Wit beer and it went perfectly with them. Also you can serve with asian slaw and

Plate full of ribs

Plate Full of ribs with corn and potatoes paired with New Belgian Mothership Wit

mashed potatoes or mac and cheese or roasted/grilled vegetables.

All I can say is these ribs are amazingly good. The sauce is rich with many flavor layers sweet, a bit spicy, and chocolate caramel from the beer and a slight tang. One word describes it best… Amazing!!

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Antica Macelleria Falorni is the oldest butcher shop in Italy. In 1729 Gio Batta founded the Macelleria Falorni Butchers in Greve Italy. In 1840 the word Antica which means ancient was added and still hangs today. It’s in the Chianti region of Tuscany. Through the generations the techniques, recipes and “secrets” to the incredibly high quality products that they produce which have been passed down from father to son. Today it is being run by the 8th generation grandsons Lorenzo and Stefano Falorni. Their attention to quality begins with using the highest quality local certified meats, Chianina for Beef and Cinta Senese for Pork and wild boars that come from the woods of the Chianti region. Spices such as fennel, laurel, juniper, garlic, parsley, sage, rosemary and more are used and all come from the local region. With this plethora of local ingredients it couldn’t be helped to create the Salumi – Salted meats, ham, salami prosciutto and more that are are characterized by the unique smell known only to fine Italian products. Even the Chianti Classico is added to some of the preparations of sausage and salame that are typical to the region of Greve also contributing to the nature of the product.

Bistec Fiorentina

Mark Schatzker said in his book “Steak, One Man’s Search for the world’s Tastiest Piece of Beef”,  the Falorni is as much a busy butcher shop as a living ode to its butchering past. Out front, facing the town square stands a butcher block that was the primary meat hacking surface from 1820 to 1956. The interior is filled with tools of the butchering trade, a stuffed wild boar, old copper scales, black & white photos of Chianinas, a bright red meat grinder and a sausage stuffing machine from 1930.

The attention to detail even goes as far as to what kind of wood is best for grilling the beef. The recommend oak and Stefano will go as far as cutting his own wood and bringing it to friends homes to make sure that the meats get their due respect.

This is one of the wonders found in the Chianti Region of Tuscany Italy. A wonderful place that we will be visiting on our Photo/Culinary experiences. Come join us in 2011 and explore the culinary wonders of this rich part of the world. Early discounts available here’s the link – Experience Italy

* Photos courtesy of Vivandare.it, Informacibo.it and Antica Macelleria Falorni

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Kaz, Pastry Chef Sequestered in the corner

I set my GPS with the address of the Test Kitchen and away I went. I came upon an old building with no name on it bathed in a red paint with black trim standing regally on Pico Bl. I parked in back and came through the back door and followed the signs downstairs into the kitchen. I walked in to see the crew from the  restaurant all lined up doing prep. The crew had been there since 10am busily getting ready for the evenings performance.  You see Test Kitchen brings in chefs from all over to test out new recipes and concepts for their restaurants or new establishments to be opened up. The prep was in the final stages when I got there. As always my first thing is to ask what else needs to be done.There were a few last minute things such as slicing some more cibatta.  I also had to use the slicer to cut buffalo tenderloin for Carpaccio. The Tenderloin had to be frozen to make cutting to the right thickness easy. The one thing that I don’t understand is why restaurant slicers are usually in less than optimal condition. Noisy seemingly on their last legs yet they do the job.

Christopher Barrigan getting ready for service.

Chef Adam Horton of Saddle Peak Lodge made sure that he had plenty of help in the kitchen, to keep things running smoothly making everything looking effortless. They put Kaz, the pastry chef, in the back corner of the kitchen like a sequestered mad scientist experimenting with all he could find.

I saw crisp chicken skin on his station and I was wondering what that was for. I soon found out, chicken skin nougatine. The  wonderful combination of flavors sweet  from the caramel, salty from the chicken skin and salt and and a bit of heat from green curry to finish it.

Chef Adam Horton getting ready for Service

Another item I saw on his station were apple slices that had been infused with hibiscus using the cryovac. The flavor combination of the hibiscus with the apple was addictive. This was part of their cheese course which included Parmegiano reggiano with white chocolate namelaka black olive nougatine and aviation cocktail sauce (gin, lemon juice sugar water Creme de violet) micro celery and a thin curved crostini. It is a very creative and tasty way to do a cheese course and tastes absolutely divine. The apple hibiscus combination is so refreshing and pairs perfectly with the intense flavor and saltiness of the  Parmigiano-Reggiano.

Chef Adam Horton, having servers taste the menu and answering quesitons

At this point the kitchen is shifting it’s energies to setting up for service. Meanwhile the front of house staff is busily readying the dining room for another big night. The next item on the list is to make on of each course for the wait staff to see and taste so they can accurately describe it to their customers. The chef gives the order to fire and the plates begin to materialize. One  by one they get put up on the pass and taken to the staff table so that Adam can

The open kitchen, a few hours before service

describe each and answer any questions that might come up. Wild Boar spread with grilled toast, Heirloom tomato buffalo and it’s cheese, Escolar with summac, edamame, horseradish uni, flavors of pho and puffed rice, Pork belly with vadouvan apple yogurt and cucumber, Elk with almond bacon brandied cherries and squash, Parmigiano Nero with apple hibiscus, white chocolate and olives, Dessert Thai green curry with chicken lemongrass cilantro and lime.

first 3 courses

First 3 courses - Wild Boar, Heirloom Tomato Buffalo, Escolar

The menu is heavenly and of course I had to taste each dish, for safety’s sake of course. They all passed with flying colors.

Last 4 courses

Pork Belly, Elk with squash scramble, Parmigiano Nero, Thai green curry

One of the new experiences for the Saddle Peak staff was the open kitchen which keeps everyone on their best behavior.

Joshua Pressman, checking tickets and plates as they go out

The Test Kitchen staff was very accommodating and everyone seemed to be working very well together. Service begins and there is a slow ramp up as the dishes are easily put together. One by one, Joshua Pressman, the expediter for the Test Kitchen, calls out the orders to the kitchen as Chef de Cuisine Chris Kufek confirms them and keeps the kitchen staff humming. The dining room begins to fill as sommelier and master mixologist

Christopher Barragan, working the drinks

Christopher Barragan is manning the bar pouring 5 drinks that he created just for the evening.  They are Tang’ent, My Darling Clementine, Q-Cumber, Pearl Jasmine, En Fleur, Testing Cocktail and Testing Mocktail, so ask for these when you see Chris at the Saddle Peak.


En Fleur - Gin, St Germaine, Sauvignon Blanc, fresh thyme and lime

Meanwhile Joshua Buckner, GM of the Saddle Peak  bridges the gap between kitchen and front of the house to make sure all is going well and of course it is.

Some of Adams friends and even current and former wait staff from the saddle peak come by to congratulate him and say hi.  The plates are going out at a steady pace one of the nice things about having only one set menu is it makes it easier for the kitchen staff while making the dining experience even more of a pleasure.


The board is filled with tickets

Service is at full swing now. The board is full with orders, “Carpaccio out, 53 four out, 4 elk grazing on judges table 44 out, a boat here for 31, 44 walking” are the call outs from Joshua to the kitchen as he inspects each plate for drips etc… before releasing them to the servers throughout all stages of service.

The focus and concentration of the expediter as he continuously scans the tickets is intense . Keeping the proper timing going is job “ad 2 more desserts, 5 all day” then he pulls the tickets down for those tables.

Ramon on Grill and Sean on squash scramble

The elk with beef sauce is so tender and sweet. The mesquite wood grill ads just the right amount of oakyness to the flavor captured with the sous vide process. The wild boar has a full flavor to it mixed with the reduced braising liquid with sherry wine. The flavor has that sweet fresh sense of the woods. The way it is raised,  there is a buttery quality to the meat that is not often found in boar.

The quenelle of lemongrass comes through beautifully. It’s like tasting lemon with the additional flavor of slight bitterness. It’s layered with candied carrot slices etc… A wonderful refreshing alternative dessert.


The line is filled and humming along

The call outs continue as the peak of the evening has passed. 9:04 and things are beginning to slow a bit. “27 pork is squeeling” as another order goes out. Ramon keeps the grill flowingChris Kufek works with Josh the expeditor to make sure that all flows smoothly. 9:09 a lull in the storm. Things are slowing. Then another wave comes in. There are 10 first courses being readied to go out. The dishwashers are humming along. Sean is busily making the butternut scramble for the elk as Ramon keeps the grill fired up and humming along with elk and the grilled cibatta slices to go with the boar. Pork bellies are frying and all cylinders are firing at the same time 9:19. Things can change at a moments notice during service. “25 & 54 elk grazing. 22 Abraham lincoln, Kufek you need boar for three Rick asks to get clarification, “pick up 3’pork 5 all day.” The board is full again and the orders are moving out.

Rick working the Wild boar

Josh comes back to tell us that the people are really happy with the food, “pick up 4 deserts goes the call as the plating continues.” Each facet of the meal is going out in perfect harmony with the next. The last table is in and now its just a matter  of working through each ticket and knocking them out one by one. One by one the dots go down on the plate then the cucumber balls and finally the pork belly, fried to crispy


Adam putting the finishing touches on Pork Belly

perfection with a soft center. One by one the tickets disappear and the last of each course gleaming. “33 fish are swimming” As the evening winds down the staff begins to clean up each station one by one as the last Wild boar Spread goes out, then the Buffalo carpaccio, then Escolar, the last of the pork belly and then Elk, and finally the Parmigianno Nero and last but not least the Thai green curry dessert.Meanwhile wellwishers come into the kitchen to congratulate Adam and staff on a spectacular meal. One person asks Adam how he would describe elk, “It’s like filet mignon on drugs”

It was a highly successful evening as Chef Adam Horton and the Saddle Peak team came together to do what they do best, create a great experience and make great food.

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So I made it to round two of the Project Food Blog competition for the next food blog star. There are 400 of us left and after this round we’ll be down to 200. You can cast your vote for me right above the blog post for the readers’ choice in this week’s challenge.
Challenge #2 was Classics, I had to pick a classic dish from another country/culture that I wasn’t familiar with so, loving Indian food I picked Chicken Biyarni. It was a fun dish to make. Project Food Blog - Entry I’m pumped for this competition and look forward to advancing all the way through, one vote at a time, with your help.

You can also  see how each of the bloggers interpreted the challenge and then you can cast your vote for your favorites!

For this week’s challenge, 200 contestants out of 400 will advance, so I need your help to vote for me to advance to the next challenge.

Thank you for your support!

Rico

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It was an evening to be remembered. I was asked by my friend Jeff Silverman and his wife Stefanie to create an Italian evening cooking class and demonstration for a fundraiser for

Jeff & Stefanie

Jeff & Stefanie Silverman

Wilbur elementary school. As we considered the evening we had to come up with a menu that would work both for a large crowd and offer both teaching as well as demonstration possibilities. Of course there is the entertainment value of the event and that’s where I come in. We met and began to plan out the menu. Using several cookbooks as references along with my own experience to come up the a menu that would satisfy and satiate all who attended. Jeff likes meat and of course as he puts it swine.

Rico & Porterhouse

2" thick prime porterhouse steaks yum!

Jeff and my love of meat was something that was evident in the final menu. The highlight being Bisteca a la Fiorentina which is a 2″ to 3″ thick Porterhouse steak marinated in olive oil and herbs then charred on the grill to a perfect medium rare on the inside. But let me not get too far ahead of myself. I got the message from Jeff that we were going to have a huge menu without restrictions. On my own I researched some more recipes and recalled several things from my travels to Italy and settled on a final menu for the evening.Prep began at 9:00am the day of the event. Jeff was so kind as to regale us with one of his famous fritatta’s which he likes to make with pasta and meat products of many varieties. My prep crew consisted of Elio and Oscar and then Angel came in to relieve Oscar at around 4:00PM. The prep went smoothly as the day progressed and we got closer and closer to show time. We actually began our cooking at around 7:00PM. The show opening up with toasts to our hosts and guests and making sure that glasses were filled.

rico Focaccia

Getting Focaccia into Oven

Suppli – Risotto Balls filled with mozzarella cheese and breaded and deep-fried

2 types of Crostini – one with wild mushrooms the other with black kale and prosciutto

Focaccia with Arugula and Sun Dried Tomatoes – This dish I demonstrated. We had the focaccia premade so I taught how to make an alfredo sauce from scratch and then had some of the participants put the alfredo sauce on the focaccia and then top it with arugula, sun-dried tomatoes and mozzarella cheese, throw that in the oven for about 10 minutes and you have a delicious goodness coaxing your taste buds moments later.

cutting tomatoes

Making Arugula & fava bean salad

We then made the Arugula and fava bean salad where the participants learned how to make orange supremes, then cut tomatoes and onions and assemble the salad.

When it comes to roast potatoes the Patate al forno – Roast Potatoes with garlic cloves is the best. The potatoes need to be blanched in water for 2-3 minutes before baking then set aside. With audience participation we had the guys take care of the seasoning and tossing of the potatoes, which was a lot of fun to see who could toss the best and highest.

Of course wine was flowing throughout the evenings festivities as glasses were refilled in a timely manner.

Earlier in the day we had put the Chicken Vin Cotto (sweet wine)  into the oven to cook since it is a bit complicated and we already had enough things going on. It came out wonderfully as one might expect.

potato toss

The Guys get into the act with the potato toss

The potatoes went in the oven and then it was time to blanch the broccoli rabe and get it ready for the 2 styles of final preparation. One with sausage the other with black olives and garlic. While one person manned the sausage cooking another was in charge of blanching all the broccoli rabe. Another glass was filled and it was time to go

Rico Teaching

It's all about the ingredients and the wine

out to the grill and cook up some meat.

The first thing to go on was the Bisteca a la Fiorentina, followed by the Uccelletti Scappati

– Skirt steak rolled with prosciutto and sage then placed on a skewer with pancetta in-between.  It was a feast for the eyes to see all this fantastic prime beef going on the grill and to bear witness to it all with awe-inspiring. Then to finish everything the rack of lamb went on and was the perfect punctuation to the meat portion of the evening.

While that was going on outside I needed to get back in to make sure that Elio was taking proper care with the dessert prep in which there were three – Cannoli, Roasted Pears with Chocolate and Strawberries in balsamic vinegar. What a trio. We had participants making the pears, cutting the strawberries and filling cannoli’s. At the same time I was teaching the making of Polenta with wild mushrooms, having one participant searing the mushrooms while the other made the polenta.  And last but not least I took care of the Pasta Carbonara as the final punctuation to end the cooking portion of the evening.

Slicing

Slicing up Rack of Lamb

Once everything was ready and the meat had properly rested then we were ready to put out the buffet and cut the meat. Part of the fun when cutting large quantities of meat is to feed those around you, who are looking on, tidbits from the meat as a precursor to the meal that is about to come.  Ahh the fun of cooking and feeding people. To watch as everyone lined up to eat the meal that we just prepared warmed my heart.  I had a blast cooking and entertaining the entire group of around 35. It was time for a scotch and a walk about to see how everyone was enjoying their meal. It was fun to see and hear the comments and talk to some of them as they enjoyed everything that we had prepared in a scant 2.5 hours. A good time was had by all. It’s something that I love doing and can do for you and your friends if you’re interested.  It was like having my own TV show.

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